Arcadia Folk Festival

Arcadia Folk Festival

Sun · September 30, 2018

10:00 am (event ends at 6:00 pm)

Mass Audubon's Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary

$34.99/Early Bird, $15/Kids 6-12

This event is all ages

Arcadia Folk Festival
Arcadia Folk Festival
SIGNATURE SOUNDS AND MASS AUDUBON PRESENT THE FIRST ANNUAL ARCADIA FOLK FESTIVAL

FESTIVAL WILL KICK OFF YEAR LONG CELEBRATION MARKING 75 YEARS OF ARCADIA WILDLIFE SANCTUARY SEPT. 30 IN EASTHAMPTON, MA

This outdoor fall musical event will bring the community together around music in the heart of the Pioneer Valley to celebrate 75 years of Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary. Arcadia is an ecological gem and an environmental education innovator. Since 1944, Arcadia staff have been protecting important habitat, connecting people of all ages to nature, and advocating for sound environmental policies.

This festival will serve to engage more people with Arcadia’s mission, raise funds to help expand the reach of Arcadia’s programming through the Arcadia Climate Action Center, and celebrate the community’s tremendous support over 75 years. The event will be on September 30, 2018 at Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary on the Easthampton/Northampton town line. This will be a green event, making every effort to reduce our impact on the planet. Environmental education activities will be integrated into the festival.

Full artist lineup and activities TBA very soon.
Darlingside
Darlingside
The word “extraordinary” is defined as something beyond, amazing, or incredible. The word “extralife” doesn’t exist. But in the world of Darlingside—another previously non-existent word—it’s all about invention, expansion, and elevating everything into
the realm of the extraordinary both conceptually and through musical performance.
The band’s new album Extralife intensifies the journey begun on its critically acclaimed 2015 album Birds Say. On that project, Darlingside’s quartet of bassist Dave Senft, guitarist/banjoist Don Mitchell, violinist/mandolinist Auyon Mukharji, and cellist/guitarist Harris Paseltiner fused assertions (“Go Back”), assumptions (“God Of Loss”), predictions (“The Ancestor”), projections (“Do You Ever Live?”) and reflections (“White Horses”). “We put our four heads together and created this collective consciousness about bits and pieces from our past and how we saw the world based upon reminiscences,” explains Paseltiner about that sojourn. It having been the Massachusetts group’s second full-length outing, Birds Say mastered a musical and lyrical path that led to the more challenging territory explored on
Extralife. Mukharji describes the “Extralife” concept as “…a life beyond where we are now, whether that's a brand new thing, a rebirth, or just a new version of ourselves as we move forward.” So by abandoning Birds Say’s nostalgia and its tales of “what
once was,” Darlingside created its polar opposite with Extralife, the new album exploring “what is now” and “what might be” simultaneously in the brave new world.
“The beach is just a line in the sand / The tide is in the palm of
your hand / It’s looking like the start or the end / Either way ahead is around the bend.” Perhaps by moving beyond our preconceptions—going Extralife—we can create an amazing future by steering this world towards something incredible. That all makes up the definition of extraordinary.
Birds of Chicago
Birds of Chicago
Birds of Chicago have been riding a swell of good mojo in the Americana scene since their  inception in late 2012. With their new album, Love in Wartime,  they are set to both confirm that roots world buzz, and break on through to a much wider audience.

Recorded in Chicago against a backdrop of bewilderment, deep divide and dread, Love in Wartime is a rock and roll suite with a cinematic sweep. Co-produced with Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), it evokes epic efforts of the 60’s and 70’s, with love as the undeniable through-line.

Built around the chemistry and fire between Allison Russell and JT Nero, and their rock-steady band, BOC tours hard. Russell and Nero played with different bands in the mid-aughts (Po’ Girl and JT and the Clouds) before finding their way to each other. Nero, who writes the bulk of the songs, found himself a transcendent vocal muse in Russell (a powerful writer herself) and the band honed its chops on the road, playing 200 shows a year between 2013-17. All that shaping and sharpening, over so many miles, led them back to Chicago’s Electrical Audio in January of 2017, to begin recording Love in Wartime.  "Any act of love is an act of bravery," says Russell.. We want to give people some good news. And we want them to be able to dance when they hear it."

Their most recent releases include 2016's Joe Henry-produced Real Midnight and 2017's EP American Flowers, BOC's debut from the label Signature Sounds Recordings. Critics have searched for the right words to describe Real Midnight’s deep lyricism, gut-punch singing and musicality…. “Secular gospel”  was one phrase that caught some traction.  That fervor is evident in Love and Wartime as well: “Roll Away the heavy stone/roll away the heavy hours/roll on in the summer moon/who’s alive who’s alive who’s alive?”  The invitation is joyous, but urgent. There’s another phrase that they used to describe poetry intoned over roots music mash-ups:  Rock n Roll.  The Birds consider themselves a rock and roll band first and foremost, and Love in Wartime doesn’t leave any doubt about that.

Birds’ shows attract a mix of indy rockers, jam-kids and Americana/roots lovers, mixing moments of hushed attention with wild, rock and soul abandon. Says Nero, “a good show can send you back out into the night feeling -- for at least a little while - that everything isn’t broken.”

These days, that’s no small thing.
Heather Maloney
Heather Maloney
Massachusetts writer and song-singer Heather Maloney celebrates the release her 2018 EP, Just Enough Sun. The six songs (five new originals and a cover of Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall") were recorded as mostly single-take, live performances in a room where instruments bled into vocal mics and vocals into instruments. The result is a raw and deeply vulnerable collection songs that follow Maloney's literate and often heartbreaking exploration of family history, childhood dreams and the adulthood realities that butt-up against them; loss, misogyny, unrequited love, poverty, and even the moral dilemma of sending monkeys into space for the sake of science. The daughter of a psychotherapist and a carpenter, Heather's songwriting is equal parts introspective and relatable.

JUST ENOUGH SUN is released by the celebrated indie record label, Signature Sounds and co-produced by accompanist Ryan Hommel. The recording effortlessly captures Hommel and Maloney's dynamic live performances as a duo, with subtle instrumentation that lifts the songs up to new places without ever shifting the focus too far from Maloney's stunningly visceral voice and thought-provoking lyrics.

Maloney's 2015 record Making Me Break was produced by Bill Reynolds (Band of Horses, Avett Brothers, Lissie) and features an all-star backing band including members of Band of Horses (Bill Reynolds, Tyler Ramsey), The Wallflowers, My Morning Jacket, and Darlingside.

Upon the release of Making Me Break, Maloney landed on SPIN Magazine’s “Artist to Watch”, with enthusiastic reviews from The Huffington Post, Consequence of Sound, and No Depression. The last song on the record, “Nightstand Drawer”, became Maloney’s first major television song placement on the CBS series “Elementary”.

As a Signature Sounds artist, Maloney has toured nationally as a headliner as well as in support of acts like Lake Street Dive, Rodrigo y Gabriela, Gary Clark Jr., Colin Hay, Mary Chapin Carpenter, and many more. In 2014 she collaborated with the rising Boston quartet Darlingside on the Woodstock EP, a tribute to the Joni Mitchell-written / Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young-covered 60’s anthem. The cover was featured on the New York Times and garnered attention from Graham Nash himself, who called the performance, “Delicious, really excellent.”
The Nields
The Nields
XVII, the Nields’ seventeenth album, is both their most personal and their most community-minded. Well into their third decade as a musical partners and—judging by this sublime album––at the very top of their game, the Nields turn to meditations on time, and turning points, their roots and community – both musical and personal – but they also express joy in the present, faith in the future, and a whole lot of hope and promise. The Nields’ albums are often an eclectic mix of ideas and music styles, but clear themes emerge. Love and China (2002) was about the fragility of love and relationships. The Full Catastrophe (2012) explored the messy experience of raising a family. XVII has the Nields looking out from midlife, focusing on themes of time, love and community.The primary inspiration behind XVII was Nerissa and Katryna’s hero, Pete Seeger, who died in January of 2014. His love of sharing music and his passion for justice had been a part of their lives since before they were born (their parents fell in love at a Pete Seeger concert). His death affected them profoundly. Pete is clearly on the album in songs like “Joe Hill” and “Wasn’t That a Time,” but the entire album is infused with his spirit. It’s there in the Nields’ delight in sharing music and in using it to build a community. And it’s there in the title XVII: when compared to a career and life like that of Pete Seeger, they’re not even out of their teens.
Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem
Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem
Harmony, rhythm, indelible songs – these are the hallmarks of Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem, the New England based folk quartet now in its 17th year. From the Newport Folk Festival to the California World Music Festival and beyond, this band’s steadfast brew of wit, camaraderie, and musicality leaves audiences everywhere humming and hopeful, spirits renewed.

Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem are Rani Arbo (fiddle, guitar), Andrew Kinsey (bass, banjo, ukulele), Anand Nayak (electric and acoustic guitars) and Scott Kessel (percussion). At the helm, Arbo is “blessed with an unmistakable voice, both light and sultry, with a hint of tremolo and smoke” (Acoustic Guitar). With Kinsey and Nayak’s vibrant baritones and Kessel’s resonant bass, the band’s signature lockstep harmonies can shake the rafters or hush the room. Arbo’s fiddle is sweet and sinewy, while Nayak’s guitar stretches across genre lines. Kinsey’s old- time bass anchors the deep groove of Kessel’s homemade percussion kit — a truly funky collection of cardboard boxes, tin cans, caulk tubes, packing-tape tambourines, bottle-cap rattles, Mongolian jaw harps, and a vinyl suitcase.
Little Roots Music
Little Roots Music
Little Roots is Annie Lynch Stevenson and Maggie Shar, often joined by the fabulous Mia Freidman when the stars align. Annie Stevenson is a professional vocalist, guitarist, songwriter, performer, recording artist, and educator originally from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Maggie Shar is a banjo playing, songwriting, performing, singing educator originally from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Mia Friedman is a virtuosic fiddler and singer as well as a composer and educator. As a trio, Little Roots performs interactive youthful interpretations of old-time and folk traditionals, as well as originals. Various combinations of fiddle, banjo, guitar, and ukulele accompany harmony singing, Appalachian folk arts, and story telling. Annie and Maggie also run weekly Little Roots music classes for children 3months to 5 years old in Florence and Easthampton, MA.

Little Roots' third album, Wildwood, to be released September 16th, 2018, was self produced and recorded by Annie's husband Garth Stevenson at their home studio in Westhampton, MA. Annie, Maggie, and Mia, bring a youthful yet traditional sound to tried-and-true old-time tunes and American folk songs. Thematically relevant to very young listeners, yet kind to adult hearts, minds, and ears. Songs include My Heart is Ready, Fly Around, Green Like a Garden, Little Johnny Brown, Roll on Buddy, Apple Tree, Jimmy Sutton, Train on The island, Dulce Dulce, Wildwood, and Feelings.
Claire Dacey
Claire Dacey
Venue Information:
Mass Audubon's Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary
127 Combs Road
Easthampton, MA, 01027
https://www.massaudubon.org/get-outdoors/wildlife-sanctuaries/arcadia